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keep well in the office lower back pain

Health tips

Statistically, research has shown that about 80% of adults would suffer from low back pain at some point in their lifetime and this condition is a major cause of job-related disability worldwide. If you are presently experiencing low back pain, here are some beneficial health tips in treating or providing considerable relief from this condition:

Avoid sitting for too long 
Whenever you sit for hours on end at a desk or watching TV, you are keeping your low back flexed and your back muscles are strained. Researchers at a Norwegian University discovered that teenagers who sat in front of TV or computer for 15 hours or more in a week were three times more likely to suffer from low back pain. Additionally, the exit plan on the off chance that you should sit for long is to extend your body or walk around at intervals to relax your muscles.

Quit Smoking 
Numerous studies have shown that smokers are more likely to suffer from low back pain than nonsmokers. Cigarette contains a substance, nicotine which disrupts blood supply to intervertebral discs of the spine leading to a crack or rupture of the discs. Also, smoking slows the healing process and depletes the oxygen supply to the muscles and drains the oxygen supply to the muscles and ligaments in the back.

Indulge in Exercise 
Numerous evidences have revealed that stretching and strengthening exercises including Yoga often help to speed recovery from chronic low back pain by enhancing the flexibility and strength of the muscle groups that support the lower back. Similarly, studies have shown that low-impact aerobic exercises are good in maintaining the integrity of intervertebral discs. The implication of this is that if you are experiencing low back pain, you need to resist the temptation of keeping yourself to delayed bedrest or staying away from all types of activity.

Take more Calcium and Vitamin D 
Arguably, the role of calcium and vitamin D in the formation of strong, healthy bones cannot be overemphasised. When your bones are strong, the possibility of suffering from low back pain due to osteoporosis is ruled out. Dietary sources that are rich in calcium and vitamin D include milk, fresh green vegetables, sardines, cheese, oranges, egg yolk and so on.

Mind your Diet 
Research has shown that the same diets that are good for your heart, weight and blood sugar are also good for your back and vice-versa. A study that was conducted in Finland discovered that individuals who experienced low back pain were more likely to have clogged the arteries supplying the spine. Furthermore, shortage of nutrient supply to the spine triggers inflammatory responses that may lead to back pain. In view of the foregoing, it's better to stick to a healthy diet of whole grains, proteins, fresh vegetables and fruits while avoiding excess caffeine and processed fatty diets.

Avoid Heavy Loads 
The nature of the jobs a lot of people do is such that they often have to lift, pull or push heavy loads, all of which put a considerable strain on your spine and ultimately set the stage for lower back pain. If you must carry a heavy load, make sure you distribute the weight evenly on both shoulders or arms to avoid tilting to one side and twisting your spine. Preferably, if you can get your hands on a bag with wheels or a rolling cart, it is better for the health of your back.

Change your Shoes 
For the ladies, this may not be a really good news. High heels compel you to arch your back and this places a strain on your spinal muscles leading to avoidable back aches. At Lehigh University, 80% of low-back patients who were given lightweight, cushioned and flexible shoes experienced significant relief from their back pain. However, occasional use of those high-heeled shoes is not likely to cause serious harm.

Sleep with a pillow under your knees 
It's been discovered that when you sleep on your back, an estimated 55 pounds of pressure is put on your spine. However, with a pillow under your knees, you reduce that pressure by 50% and decrease your risk of low back pain.

keep well in the office lower back pain

keep well in the office fibromyalgia

Fibro Fog

Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition that affects about 5 million Americans. Doctors diagnose fibromyalgia based on a patient's symptoms and physical exam. Patients experience pain and stiffness in the muscles, but there are no measurable findings on X-rays or most lab tests. While fibromyalgia does not damage the joints or organs, the constant aches and fatigue can have a significant impact on daily life.

Fibromyalgia Symptoms:

– The hallmark of fibromyalgia is muscle pain throughout the body, typically accompanied by: 
– Fatigue 
– Sleep problems 
– Anxiety or depression 
– Specific tender points

Fibromyalgia Tender Points:

One of the unique aspects of fibromyalgia is the presence of tender points in specific locations on the body. When these points are pressed, people with fibromyalgia feel pain, while people without the condition only feel pressure. This illustration shows 18 possible tender points.

Fibromyalgia: The Pain Is Real:

The pain of fibromyalgia can be intense. Because traditionally no lab tests or X-rays could confirm a diagnosis of fibromyalgia, some patients were once led to believe this pain was "all in their heads." But the medical community now accepts that the pain of fibromyalgia is real. Research suggests it's caused by a glitch in the way the body perceives pain.

Fibromyalgia: Who's at Risk?

Women between the ages of 25 and 60 have the highest risk of developing fibromyalgia. Doctors aren't sure why, but women are 10 times more likely to have the condition than men. Some researchers believe genetics may play a role, but no specific genes have been identified.

Fibromyalgia and Fatigue:

After pain, the most common and debilitating symptom of fibromyalgia is fatigue. This is not the normal tiredness that follows a busy day, but a lingering feeling of exhaustion. People with fibromyalgia may feel tired first thing in the morning, even after hours spent in bed. The fatigue may be worse on some days than others and can interfere with work, physical activity, and household chores.

Causes of Fibromyalgia:

There are many theories about the causes of fibromyalgia, but research has yet to pinpoint a clear culprit. Some doctors believe hormonal or chemical imbalances disrupt the way nerves signal pain. Others suggest a traumatic event or chronic stress may increase a person's susceptibility. Most experts agree that fibromyalgia probably results from a combination of factors, rather than a single cause.

Fibromyalgia: Impact on Daily Life

Constantly fighting pain and fatigue can make people irritable, anxious, and depressed. You may have trouble staying on task at work, taking care of children, or keeping up with household chores. Exercise or hobbies such as gardening may seem daunting. Exhaustion and irritability can also lead to missing out on visits with friends.

Diagnosing Fibromyalgia

Your doctor may diagnose fibromyalgia after hearing your symptoms and doing a physical exam. There's one lab test that can check for fibromyalgia. It measures the levels of proteins in the bloodstream and can help confirm a fibro diagnosis. However, your doctor may also do some testing to rule out other conditions. Be sure to describe your pain in detail, including where and how often it occurs. Also bring up any other symptoms, such as fatigue, sleep problems, or anxiety.

Fibromyalgia: Getting Treatment

Fibromyalgia was once the exclusive domain of rheumatologists. Today, the condition has captured the attention of a wide range of health care providers. Many people receive treatment through their primary care providers. Check with local support groups and hospitals for a list of fibromyalgia experts in your area.

Fibromyalgia Triggers

An important first step is identifying what makes your symptoms worse. Common triggers include: 
– Cold or humid weather 
– Too much or too little physical activity 
– Stress 
– Poor sleep

Fibromyalgia and Sleep

Many people with fibromyalgia have sleep problems, including trouble falling asleep or frequent awakenings during the night. Studies suggest some patients remain in a shallow state of sleep and never experience restful, deep sleep. This deprives the body of a chance to repair and replenish itself, creating a vicious cycle. Poor sleep may make pain seem worse, and pain can lead to poor sleep.

Fibromyalgia and Depression

Nearly a third of people with fibromyalgia also have major depression when they are diagnosed. The relationship between the two is unclear. Some researchers believe depression may be a result of the chronic pain and fatigue. Others suggest that abnormalities in brain chemistry may lead to both depression and an unusual sensitivity to pain. Symptoms of depression may include difficulty concentrating, hopelessness, and loss of interest in favorite activities.

Managing Fibromyalgia: Medication

The goal of fibromyalgia treatment is to minimize pain, sleep disturbances, and mood disorders. Doctors may recommend medications that help ease your symptoms — ranging from familiar over-the-counter pain relievers to prescription drugs. There are also prescription drugs specifically approved for the treatment of fibromyalgia, which include Cymbalta, Lyrica, and Savella.

Managing Fibromyalgia: Exercise

Exercise can relieve several fibromyalgia symptoms. Physical activity can reduce pain and improve fitness. Exercising just three times a week has also been shown to relieve fatigue and depression. But it's important not to overdo it. Walking, stretching, and water aerobics are good forms of exercise to start with for people with fibromyalgia.

Managing Fibromyalgia: Diet

Some experts say diet may play a role in fibromyalgia — just not the same role in all patients. Certain foods, including aspartame, MSG, caffeine, and tomatoes, seem to worsen symptoms in some people. But avoiding these foods won't help everyone. To find out what works for you, try eliminating foods one at a time and recording whether your symptoms improve.

Managing Fibromyalgia: Massage

Some research suggests massage may help relieve fibromyalgia pain, though its value is not fully proven. Practitioners say that applying moderate pressure is key, while the technique is less important. Rubbing, kneading, or stroking all seem to help. A significant other can learn to provide regular massages — and a 20-minute session may be long enough to get results.

Managing Fibromyalgia: Acupuncture

Formal studies have produced mixed results on the use of acupuncture for fibromyalgia, but some patients say it eases their symptoms. This traditional Chinese practice involves inserting thin needles at key points on the body. Acupressure stimulates the same pressure points and may be a good alternative for people who want to avoid needles.

Managing Fibromyalgia: Fibro Fog

Many people with fibromyalgia have trouble concentrating, a phenomenon known as fibro fog. While getting treatment for pain and insomnia may help, there are other steps you can take to improve your focus.

Managing Fibromyalgia: Stress

Stress appears to be one of the most common triggers of fibromyalgia flare-ups. While it's impossible to eliminate all stress from your life, you can try to reduce unnecessary stress. Determine which situations make you anxious — at home and at work — and find ways to make those situations less stressful. Experiment with yoga, meditation, or other relaxation techniques. And allow yourself to skip nonessential activities that cause stress.

Does Fibromyalgia Get Better?

Many people with fibromyalgia find that their symptoms and quality of life improve substantially as they identify the most effective treatments and make lifestyle changes. While fibromyalgia is a chronic condition, it does not damage the joints, muscles, or internal organs.

keep well in the office fibromyalgia

cts keep well in the office

CTS

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is a disease that occurs in the wrist and it is affecting more and more individuals each year. As a result of unwarranted pressure occurring on the median nerve, a nerve located in the wrist and responsible for much of the functioning of the hand, the symptoms of Carpal Tunnel may appear.

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Symptoms associated with Carpal Tunnel are mild to severe pain in the joints, fingers, hands and/or arms, unexplained numbness and tingling, and in some cases, difficulty using the hands or arms due to weakness brought on by the onset of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

The reasons or causes of CTS vary. Sometimes Carpal Tunnel Syndrome arises because the individual in question possesses another condition that was the cause of its onset, while other individuals may have engaged in actions that brought about the onset of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. Still other individuals may get Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and may never really know the reasons why. The causes of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome include, but are in no way limited to:

Aging–natural aging can result in the weakening of the tissues within one's wrist as well as the bones. With repeated and constant use, an issue with Carpal tunnel may develop over time as pressure increases on the median nerve.

Diabetes–Diabetes is a disease that is well known for creating nerve compression, especially in the feet, but it can also cause nerve compression in the hands as well. When a person with Diabetes winds up with a compressed median nerve, the result is the formation of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

Ganglion cysts–cysts can form inside of the wrist and directly place pressure on the median nerve and the surrounding area–the result? You guessed it–Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. Tumors also produce the same affect when they are located in an individual's wrist and can prove to be the cause behind the onset of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

Gout–gout is a disease that can affect the joints and nerves of the people affected by it. As a result, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome sometimes becomes a secondary condition for the patient with gout.

Improperly healed injuries–former injuries to the wrist area that may have healed incorrectly can also bring on a case of CTS.

Lupus–Lupus is a tricky disease as it often mimics the symptoms of other diseases. Joint pain can be a result and a person may actually have Carpal Tunnel when they have Lupus, or they may simply exhibit the symptoms of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and not really have it at all. Rheumatoid arthritis is another joint condition that produces similar results.

Repetitive motion injuries–this is one of the biggest reasons for developing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. Many jobs require employees to make repeated motions with their hands and even if the motion seems harmless, like typing and excessive keyboarding, they can result in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome can be treated with a number of non-invasive techniques and if such techniques fail, then surgery can be contemplated. The pain that is associated with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is typically managed with pain medications, chiropractic visits, and physical therapy. In extreme cases, when surgery is needed, the surgery focuses on removing the pressure from the median nerve in the wrist by making the tunnel that holds the median nerve wider. Unfortunately, surgical procedures that address the issue of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome can result in permanent scarring on the wrists.

Ultimately, the effects of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome can be extremely painful. In fact, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome can be so painful it creates a grave disability for the individual that has it. Never the less, there are a few things people can do to fight Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and its onset. Preemptive measures against Carpal Tunnel Syndrome include:

Maintaining overall body health–when an individual is completely healthy, the risk of getting Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is lowered. Although some conditions are unavoidable, conditions like obesity can be avoided and can reduce the risks associated with getting Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

Stay away from bad habits–Smoking is also associated with the onset of Carpal Tunnel–smoking restricts nerves and may cause them to swell. The swelling in the median nerve then results in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. Therefore refraining from such habits is an effective measure in preventing the onset of Carpal Tunnel.

Using ergonomically designed equipment–when involved in jobs that involve repetitive motion, it becomes necessary to use special equipment that can help prevent the onset of carpal tunnel. Specially designed keyboards, mice, wrist pads, and wrist stints can actually help prevent the onset of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and other repetitive motion related injuries. Finally, taking frequent breaks from jobs that require repetitive motion can also keep Carpal Tunnel Syndrome at bay.

cts keep well in the office

sciatica keep well in the office

Pain on your lower middle back

If you feel pain on your lower middle back when you bend or stretch and it radiates down to your legs, then you might be experiencing sciatica. But what is sciatica? It is a pain manifestation which resulted from the irritation of the sciatic nerve. The pain usually begins at the lower middle back and may extend down to the calf and foot depending on the affected nerve root. Sciatica is not a disorder by itself but a symptom resulted from another medical condition. People who are usually affected by sciatica are suffering from a herniated disc. Any factor which directly inflicts irritation and inflammation on the sciatic nerve produces the symptoms of sciatica.

The sciatic nerve is the largest nerve in the body. Its nerve roots run from the lumbar spinal cord located at the lower back extending through the buttocks, hips and lower limb. When this nerve becomes inflamed or irritated it produces pain that resembles like a leg cramp. It makes neither sitting nor standing difficult due to the intensity of pain it inflicts. Typically the pain is aggravated when sitting, sneezing or coughing. Pain in acute sciatica usually lasts for four to eight weeks and diminishes on its own depending on the causative agent.

Sciatica is often caused by the slipping of discs. It is common in people between the ages of 30-50 partly because of aging. The general wear and tear of the surrounding muscle of the back can easily be affected by any sudden pressure on the disks. The disks serve as a cushion of the bone in the lower spine and if it deteriorates may result to the symptom of sciatica; the intensity of pain inflicted by sciatica varies.

The compression of the sciatic nerve gives rise to sciatica. When the disc slips or bulges, pain at the lower back is the first symptom that is being manifested. Its symptoms may include burning sensation, numbness and tingling sensation.

Diagnosis of sciatica normally includes a thorough medical assessment. Generally, the doctor explains how the pain started and its common symptoms. Proper knowledge and awareness are vital for the patient to clearly understand what is sciatica and how does it affect them. The doctor may also have to review its signs and symptoms through a physical assessment. Physical exam will help determine its cause to be able to give a concrete prognosis. The test is also used to pinpoint the affected nerves. Other tests such as x-ray and MRI may be recommended for further evaluation.

Basically the main goal of treatment for sciatica is to decrease pain intensity and increase mobility. The cure for sciatica would normally involve rehabilitation, surgery and medical management. If sciatica goes untreated it might lead to a chronic condition and further complications. Acute sciatica condition usually goes away with proper rest and time, without the need for surgery or any medical management. There are ways to help prevent sciatica like regular exercise to strengthen the back muscles and maintaining proper body posture at all times.

Would you like to Discover more about Sciatica Pain?

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152886keep well in the office drink water14_214119109039024_4158483862298201257_o

Drink enough water

These days, you can't turn your head without being reminded of the importance of drinking enough water. But does an adequate supply of H20 really make a difference to how you feel on a daily basis? Could dehydration be contributing to or even to blame for your aches and pains?

Absolutely, yes!

Most people don't drink enough water and this is an issue that should not be taken lightly. If you suffer from back pain, it's worth evaluating how much water intake you get on a daily basis as dehydration can have serious damaging effects on the spine.

The discs between each vertebra in your spine are largely made up of water. If your body is dehydrated, the discs are at risk of shrinking which can add pressure on the spinal nerves, resulting in pain and even neurological symptoms. Chronic dehydration can lead to the spine becoming less stable which can cause herniated and bulging discs. So the answer is an affirmative yes; not drinking enough water can absolutely affect how you feel on a daily basis – especially when it comes to back pain!

Worryingly, many people suffer from debilitating back pain for years without even realising that dehydration could be the cause. As dehydration can even lead to a lack of flexibility and joint stiffness, many people can wrongly assume they are suffering from arthritis or another chronic disease, when their bodies are simply lacking water.

Of course, back pain is just one of a host of symptoms that dehydration can cause. Here are just a few other reasons to keep up your water intake:

To Maintain Good Circulation 
Dehydration can lead to persistent headaches, also dizziness, blurred vision and hearing difficulties.

For Good Energy Levels 
If your body is dehydrated you may feel weak, fatigued or exhausted. This is usually because dehydration causes the blood to thicken, resulting in the heart having to work harder to pump the blood around the body. It's always better to drink a glass of water than a cup of coffee or a sugary drink if you feel in need of an energy boost.

To Maintain a Healthy Weight 
A low water intake can lead to a slow metabolism and weight gain. Most people find that they naturally lose some weight just by drinking more water on a daily basis.

For Healthy Sinuses 
If you are not drinking enough water your sinuses and the lining of your lungs are at risk of becoming dry, which can sometimes lead to breathing issues.

The damaging effects of dehydration on the body could take up an entire book; this article simply highlights some of the most common. Start making a focused effort to add more water to your fluid intake. You're likely to see some positive changes to your health.

Offcourse some of the symptoms mentioned above can be caused by other medical conditions and the possibility of dehydration should be considered when other causes have been eliminated. Contact your health care provider if you are at all concerned about any of your symptoms.

152886keep well in the office drink water14_214119109039024_4158483862298201257_o